ST.  MARK'S CHURCH

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16th July 2014

 

 

Memories of St. Mark's Church

 

My great grandparents, Joseph Groves And Elizabeth Richards were married on 25th December 1903 at St Marks Church, here are the bans for them

 

 

 

My grandparents on my mum’s side lived on St Marks Crescent in the 70's too!

 

Regards

 

Lynne Armstrong

 

 

 

 

 

29th April 2014

 

Memories of St. Mark's Church

 

 

Mr. Harry Swain, Verger of St. Mark's

The North Aisle and Lady Chapel

 

 

 

 

 

24th December 2009

 

Memories of St. Mark's Church

 

 

Photograph courtesy of Andrew Maxam

 

 

 

Thanks to Stephen Carrico for sending in the map showing St. Mark's Church and the Vicarage

 

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I was redirected to this wonderful site from Birmingham History forum. 

My parents were married in March 1945 at St Mark's and the only photo I have is one taken just inside the doorway.

 

 

 

 

Kind regards

Diane

 

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Thank your for mentioning the whereabouts of St Marks Church.

 

 

 


What a quick response from Albert Moulsdale too, along with some interesting facts that I can add to my family history files.
 
In my experience what ever research you find out for someone, no matter how grateful they truly are , it is never enough.
 
True to form, the same applies to me. I would dearly love someone to magically come up with a photo of the church, can you help? 
 
Do your best for me,
 
Good Wishes,
 
Jacqui Fielding, nee George

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St Marks Church was in "little" St Marks Street. It was nicknamed little as the street was cut in two by King Edwards Road. It ran from Summerhill Street to Shakespeare Road and, as I said was dissected. 

 

It was almost two separate Streets, if my memory serves me right, as the two parts were not totally in  line. The church was demolished a long time ago as it was in danger of collapsing. It was made of sandstone and had crumbled badly.

 

Albert Moulsdale

 

 

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St Marks also had a school attached to it, it was my first school, can't remember when it closed, but I attended there in the war years, before moving to Steward Street school, the church was situated on the corner of Kings Edward Road, and Little St Marks Street.

 

Graham Sullivan

 

 

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I lived in St. Marks Street between 1953 and 1960 and if there had been a church in Little St. Marks Street I'd have known.

 

There was however a building that had all the characteristics of a church located behind the factory that ran along Goodman Street opposite the recreation ground. It was accessed through a gate on King Edwards Street. To the left of the gate and on the corner with Little St. Marks there was a relatively modern building that housed a paint distributor warehouse.

 

The sandstone building was about thirty feet away from the gate on the right hand side abutting the factory.

 

The factory I believe has been turned into luxury apartments, perhaps traces still remain.

 

Regards,

Sid

 

 

Response

 

Just to confirm and expand on Sid’s comment. I lived in Little St Marks Street from around 1948 to 1956. There was a wallpaper factory at the King Edwards Road end of the street and next to this, right on the corner of Little St Marks Street and King Edwards Road was a patch of waste land. I would guess that this was the main site of the church. As Sid notes there was a little gate in King Edwards Road and through this was a part of the church / school? which was used as a Sunday School. Regarding the picture of the verger Harry Swain, I remember there was a girl Joyce Swain (his daughter?) who lived adjacent to the Sunday School building. 

Frank

 

 

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In answer to the question of the location of where was the location of St Mark's Church the answer is it was in King Edwards Road just off the corner of little St Marks St.

 

My mum who lived in both streets remembers it.

 

Regards

 

Dave Marsh

 

 

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I saw on your site a request about St Mark's Church - as to its whereabouts.   

 

St Mark's Street was an odd shaped street, broken by a kind of open space - a 'square' if you like, and the church was on the corner of St Mark's Street (the second section after the space), and King Edward's Street.  It's on the 1914 man of Birmingham (West), including Ladywood.

 

Pauline Roberts

 

 

 

 

 

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